Autonomy Arrangements in the World

Autonomy is a matter of interest not only for academics, but equally for practitioners involved in negotiations about institutional design (politicians, civil servants, their advisors and third party facilitators from international organizations). Bearing this in mind, the research conducted for this project also has a decidedly practical purpose, i.e. to make precisely such people aware of the wealth of options provided by existing autonomy arrangements. Even though it is not possible to transplant one arrangement in its entirety from one context to another, such awareness may facilitate the work of practitioners because it prevents them from having to re-invent every single aspect of the wheel. This has two main implications for our research. First, in order to demonstrate the real wealth of options at hand, we do not limit ourselves to the analysis of the widely acclaimed standard cases, but also cover lesser-known and so far understudied arrangements of autonomy. Secondly, the practical approach compels us to focus on information that is really useful for practitioners and to present it in a user-friendly manner. Read more....

Lastest News

  • Webinar on "Autonomous Island Regions, Indigenous Peoples, and Self-Determination: Insights from Greenland and New Caledonia"

    28 Februar 2023 (Bolzano/Bozen, Italy)

    The 2023 webinar of our Annual Webinar Series "Discussing World Autonomies" focuses on "Autonomous Island Regions, Indigenous Peoples, and Self-Determination: Insights from Greenland and New Caledonia". It will take place on 28 February at 5 p.m. CET. Maria Ackrén (Associate Professor in Political Science at the University of Greenland) and Elisabeth Alber (Senior Researcher at the Institute for Comparative Federalism, Eurac Research) will discuss with Sergiu Constantin the particularities and similarities of the two case studies. Join us and register here: https://bit.ly/autonomies2023.

  • ECMI Conversations with Experts: "Territorial Autonomy and Conflict Regulation"

    16 December 2022 (Flensburg, Germany)

    The 11th episode features ECMI's Senior Researcher Dr. Felix Schulte talking to Dr. Dawn Walsh about territorial autonomy as a solution to violent ethnic conflicts. Specifically, they look into the role of guarantee mechanisms and independent commissions in such arrangements. Dr. Dawn Walsh is an Assistant Professor in the School of Politics and International Relations, and Director of the Institute for British-Irish Studies at University College Dublin. She is also currently the holder of an Irish Research Council Laureate Award for her project 'Power-sharing and independent commissions in post-conflict societies'. You can watch here the recording of this episode.

Latest Publications

  • Realising Linguistic, Cultural and Educational Rights Through Non-Territorial Autonomy

    David J. Smith, Ivan Dodovski, Flavia Ghencea (eds); Publication: 2023

    This open access volume assesses Non-Territorial Autonomy (NTA) in terms of its practical capacity to support the linguistic, cultural, and educational rights of national minority groups across Europe. Its numerous detailed empirical studies, one of which uses the Framework Convention on National Minorities reporting as a benchmark, give a picture of the extent (or otherwise) to which international minority rights standards are actually being realized through various NTA arrangements. In keeping with the principles laid out in these foundational documents, the contributions to this volume acknowledge that when it comes to the effective delivery of linguistic, cultural and educational rights, NTA is best regarded not as an alternative but as a complement to territorially based arrangements. Read more...

  • The Routledge Handbook of Comparative Territorial Autonomies

    Brian C. H. Fong and Atsuko Ichijo (eds); Publication: 2022

    This Handbook affords a comprehensive, pioneering and interdisciplinary survey of this emerging field. Moving beyond traditionally narrower engagements with the subject, it combines approaches to comparative law and comparative politics to provide an authoritative guide to the principal theoretical and empirical topics in the area. Bringing together a team of cutting-edge scholars from different disciplines and continents, the volume illuminates the latest thinking and scholarship on comparative territorial autonomies. This Handbook is an authoritative, essential reference text for students, academics and researchers in its field. It will also be of key interest to those in the fields of comparative politics, comparative law, local/regional government, federalism, decentralisation and nationalism, as well as practitioners in think tanks, NGOs and international governmental organisations. Read more...

PROJECT PARTNER

In order to give you a better service this site uses cookies. Additionally third party cookies are used. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

Privacy PolicyOK

scrolltop